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  Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

English English 9 (2) 211102 English 9 (3) 211103

The primary focus of the Ninth Grade English course is the study of genre. Students are taught the characteristics of the short story, nonfiction, poetry, novel, and drama. In addition, they study the characteristic structure of each genre – the structure of the short story, nonfiction, the novel, and the three act or five act play. They also study the poets’ use of poetic structure and language. All students are required to read and report on four full-length works per semester Language conventions are taught as needed through writing. Grammar skills include parts of speech, parts of a sentence, capitalization, punctuation, and usage. Spelling and vocabulary lessons are based on words students need to learn as evidenced by their writing. Students practice speaking and listening skills through a variety of activities. They give oral reports on their readings, and they work extensively with response partners or in small groups during the prewriting and revision stages of writing lessons.

English 10 (2) 212102 English 10 (3) 212103

 This course builds on the study of genre in the Ninth Grade. In this curriculum, students explore themes in literature, points of view, symbolism, characterization, irony, and literary language. In exploring each of these aspects of literature, students read a variety of genre – short story, nonfiction, drama, poetry, and the novel. Additionally, students are required to read four full-length works each semester. Language conventions are taught as needed through writing. Vocabulary development is directly related to the literary selections. Lessons in spelling are based on students’ written compositions. Writing assignments are made in the context of the writing process. Topics for compositions are an outgrowth of literary selections. Students write multi-paragraph papers and answer essay questions. Students practice skills in speaking and listening through a variety of classroom activities; whole class discussion, group work in prewriting and revision, reports on required reading and improvisations and role-playing based on literature studied, as well as interpretative readings on assigned works.

American Literature/English 11 (2) 213102 American Literature/English 11 (3) 213103

Students in American Literature explore the literature of the United States from colonial times to the present. The selections are studied in terms of how they affect and are affected by the social and historical climate. In addition, students read a variety of literary genre: easy, poetry, and short story. They read to interpret, to evaluate, and to expand vocabulary. Additionally, students are required to read four full-length works per semester. In writing, students review a variety of ways to write sentences (sentence combining). They progress from one paragraph, three paragraph, and five paragraph papers with the culminating activity being a research paper. Students practice speaking skills through a variety of activities. They give oral reports and work in small groups. Students participate in class discussions. They take roles in plays and improvise characters in literature to add variety and focus to class discussions. Students are involved in a variety of activities designed to enhance listening skills. They listen to the teacher and to each other; they respond by taking notes and asking questions. Students also listen to recordings to determine message, tone, purpose, and effect in literature.

British Literature/English 12 (2) 214102 British Literature/English 12 (2) 214102

British literature is the basis of this curriculum. It is a historical survey starting with Anglo-Saxon literature, proceeding through Medieval, Renaissance, Puritan, 17th Century, 18th Century, Romantic, Victorian, and 20th Century writers. The literature is used as a departure point for a variety of writing exercises. Specific and appropriated reading skills are taught. In addition, students are required to read four full-length works per semester. Instruction in language and grammatical skills is systematically provided. Usage and fundamental communication skills are reviewed. Because this is the last formal educational situation for many of our students, the primary thrust of the language instruction is clear communications. Writing is the direct result of ideas encountered in literature. Sentence sense, paragraph cohesion, and theses development are stressed. These writing techniques are reviewed and practiced while elements of developing a personal style of writing are introduced. Writing is essentially an integrated thinking process, and as such, it is the most important activity of the Twelfth Grade curriculum. Informal speaking skills are the main thrust of classroom speech instruction. The course’s literary study is generated from an active informal speech environment. Much if British literature can only be understood through thorough discussion and intensive idea exchange between peers and teachers. As a result, students are expected to verbally challenge, interpret, clarify, and digest the ideas and materials they encounter. Listening instruction is an ongoing process of an integrated curriculum. Students are taught to focus on the listening task, recognize verbal cues, identify main ideas, interpret meaning and evaluate the validity of a speaker’s tone and purpose.

AP English (4) 214104

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition is a course emphasizing the development of skills in critical reading of imaginative and discursive literature and in writing about literature and related ideas. It is designed for students capable of doing college level work in English while they are in secondary school, who are willing to devote the energy necessary to complete a course more rigorous and demanding than outer high school English courses designed for the college bound student Because of the rigorous demands of this course, students are expected to devote as much time as necessary to keep current with class assignments and homework. The course requires extensive out-of-class reading. This course is designed to prepare students to take an advanced placement test and earn up to two semesters of college credit in English. Prior to the first day of class, two/three major outside readings may be required.

College Research (3) 213113

In this course, college-bound students are provided with specific information and skills necessary for successful academic performance in areas of study skills, problem-solving, use of media resources, and the research process. Students also receive instruction in work processing, SAT preparation, and college entrance requirements.

Journalism (3) 220143

This course is designed to provide students with educational experiences which culminate in the actual production of a quality school paper. Students learn about the legality, staff organization, responsibility, history and philosophy of journalism. They learn to differentiate between, define and write feature articles, editorials, straight news articles and sports stories. This course also provides students with experiences in the technical production o f a newspaper. These include layout, scheduling, ad solicitation, and photography. Journalism followed by Newspaper Production satisfies the Technology Education requirement.

Newspaper (3) 220153

In this course students publish monthly editions of the school newspaper. Students research and write articles in a variety of formats. They size photographs, draw graphics or use clip art, and prepare a camera-ready copy for printing. Students are responsible for all business aspects of the newspaper. Students successfully completing the Journalism course and one semester of Newspaper Production will fulfill the technology education credit. An additional semester of Newspaper Production may count as Advanced Technology credit.

Creative Writing (3) 220123

The Creative Writing course includes traditional and non-traditional writing in various genres. The class receives practice in critiquing and being critiqued. In general, Creative Writing is a class that requires thinking skills and the willingness to share one’s work. This class is intended to instruct and inspire.

Warriors Communications Arts (2) 220183

Yearbook (also Advanced Technology) (3) 220173

This class is directly responsible for the production of the high school yearbook. This class teaches students the basic principles of magazine style publication. Students gain practical knowledge of layout and advertising design and production; photography; photo editing; and research, interview, writing, and editing techniques for articles. Students also learn a variety of computer skills including: word processing, data base construction and management, and camera-ready graphics production techniques. The class is activities based and product oriented. Students are directly involved in every aspect of publication production from planning to advertising sales, to actual production and even sales and distribution. Students earning credit in this class will have a sound knowledge base for finding employment in a variety of publications occupations and their related fields. One Advanced Technology credit may be awarded upon successful completing of this course.

 Communications Arts (2) 220183

This course offers a broad survey of a variety of communications arts areas. Some of these include: interpersonal communications, nonverbal communications, speech and listening skills, basic radio and television productions, advertising, and written communication – both creative and journalistic. Later, students have the opportunity to apply some of these skills through educational assess channel television productions, daily morning in-house radio broadcasts and cable television radio broadcasts, publication of a communications arts magazine, producing a variety of film productions for the state film festival, and ongoing public service awareness programs. On Advanced Technology credit may be awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Social Studies Government (2) 611102 Government (3) 611103

The primary goal to the government course is to give students the basic information they need in order to function as a citizen on the local, state, national, and international level. The course will acquaint students with the duties, responsibilities and structure of government and politics in the United States. The course will take into consideration the importance of government education which is necessary to be an involved citizen who understands and supports democratic principles, institutions, and processes. The course will focus on the relationship between U.S. history, politics, government, and world history. The major emphasis of the course evolves around student based activities, direct involvement through community based volunteerism, and indirect involvement through social and political activities. Through the use of various activities (role-playing, game simulations, research, writing projects, fields trips, etc.), students will learn about issues and problems previously on a local level and how they relate to a global perspective. Students will meet the service learning requirement and core learning goals.

World History (2) 612102 World History (3) 612103

This course is designed to help students become familiar with diverse civilizations and develop an understanding of the history which has culminated in current world situations. Students study at least one new European civilization in depth while surveying the history of humankind from the Renaissance to the present. Students examine the geographic, economic, and social conditions and their influence on the modern world. According to a chronological history of Western Europe, students then study the concepts of industrialization, nationalism, revolution, and imperialism. In the final units, student focus on the modern world with an extensive review of (1) World War II and (2) the Soviet economy, government and history followed by (3) an examination of present day world problems (the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Europe)

U.S. History (2) 613102 U.S. History (2) 613103

This course is a chronological survey of United States History from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis is given to the acquisition of skills so that students can evaluate social, economic, political, and diplomatic developments in the United States. The ultimate goal of the course is to have students gain sufficient knowledge and understanding of the past so they will be better prepared as responsible adult citizens.

AP US History (4) 613104

This Advanced Placement Program in American History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills

Psychology (3) 623103

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior. The course content includes physiology of the nervous system, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning theory, motivation, emotion, personality, abnormal behavior, and developmental and social psychology.

AP Psychology (4) 623104

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Psychology AP Psychology is a course designed for college-bound students. This course will be taught from a biological perspective with the emphasis being on understanding the physical origins of behavior. Students will apply their learning’s to the following areas of study: sensation and perception; development; states of consciousness; learning and memory; thinking, language and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; abnormal behavior and therapy; stress and health; social behavior; and statistical reasoning in everyday life. This course is designed to prepare the student to take an advanced placement test and earn up to two semesters of college credit in psychology.

Science Actions Physics (3) 531103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra I Action Physics is designed for the student wishing to begin the study of physics in the 9th grade. Students will use the mathematics foundation of Algebra I to study the laws of mechanics, how the laws of electricity and magnetism affect nature and technology. Students will apply the laws of thermodynamics to practical applications, study and use waves and apply the principles of quantum energy to various applications.

ChemCom (2) 521102 ChemCom (3) 521103

This course addresses the issues that concern the students’ life, their community, and the relation of chemistry to them. Laboratory activities and other problem-solving exercises ask students to apply their chemical knowledge to a particular problem. Students seek solutions and evaluate the consequences of those they propose, because chemistry applied to communities is not without consequences.

Chemistry I (3) 522103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra I is strongly recommended. This course is a theoretical/mathematical approach to the study of chemistry. Topics include: atomic theory, the structure of matter, chemical bonding, the periodic table, kinetic molecular theory, solutions, redox reactions, chemical calculations and basic stoichiometry. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and mathematical interpretation of laboratory investigations. This course is strongly recommended for the college bound student.

Accelerated Chemistry (3) 523103

Accelerated Chemistry is an extension of Chemistry I. In high schools offering both courses the curriculum may be spread out over a two-year period to provide an in-depth study and increased laboratory experience. This course is strongly recommended for students planning careers in Math, Science, Engineering or Medicine.

AP Chemistry (4) 524104

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Accelerated Chemistry is strongly recommended. This is a college level Chemistry course. It is designed to prepare students to take an advanced placement test and earn college credit in Chemistry.

Physics (4) 533103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra II and Geometry. This course represents a theoretical and mathematical approach to the study of classical physics. The four basic areas are mechanics or motion, thermodynamics, wave motion (to include light), and electricity and magnetism. Emphasis will be placed on interpretation of original laboratory data. Physics is strongly recommended for the highly motivated, math able, college bound student.

Biology (2) 512102 Biology (3) 512103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ChemCom, Action Physics or Chemistry High School Biology is an introductory study of living things and their environment. Topics include: the relationship between the structure and function of biologically important molecules and their relationship to cell processes; how all organisms are composed of cells which can function independently or as part of multicellular organisms; how genetic traits are inherited and passed on from one generation to another; and, the interdependence of diverse living organisms and their interactions with the components of the biosphere.

Zoology (3) 513133

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Level II or III Biology, Level III Chemistry, Level II or III ChemCom This course is recommended for those students planning to take the Accelerated Biology/Advance Placement Biology sequence. Zoology is a life science elective designed to meet the needs of college bound students. Current issues in Biology are studied, including: the kingdom of Animals, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Evolution, Ecology, and Biotechnology. Due to the challenging nature of this course, students are expected to keep current with the reading and written work. This course may include the dissection of preserved animal specimens. Alternative activities are provided should the student or parent request non-participation. The parent should submit a written request for the alternative activities to the course instructor.

Accelerated Biology (3) 513103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Chemistry and Biology. Zoology is high recommended. Accelerated Biology is an in-depth study of molecular and cellular biology to prepare students for Advanced Placement Biology. Topics to be studied include: Organic chemistry, bioenergetics, molecular genetics, cytology, and genetic engineering. This course may include the dissection of preserved animal specimens. Alternative activities are provided should the student or parent request non-participation. The parent should submit a written request for the alternative activities to the course instructor.

AP Biology (4) 514104

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Accelerated Biology. This is a college level course in Biology. The course is designed to prepare students to take an advanced placement test and earn up to eight college credits in Biology. Students are required to perform all of the twelve laboratory exercises (3 hours each) some of which may extend beyond the school day. This course may include the dissection of preserved animal specimens. Alternative activities are provided should the student or parent request non-participation. The parent should submit a written request for the alternative activates to the course.

Marine Biology (2)

513112 Marine Biology involves the study of selected groups of marine plants and animals to develop an understanding of biological marine principles. Topics will include the marine environment, adaptations of marine life, and the effect of humans on the marine ecosystem. This course may include the dissection of preserved animal specimens. Alternative activities are provided should the student or parent request non-participation. The parent should submit a written request for the alternative activities to the course.

Environmental Science (3) 543103

This course deals with ecology; the study of how life interacts with its environment. Man’s effects on the environment will be traced from the days of early cave man to the present. Field studies will be conducted to examine the plants and animals of various ecosystems. Also the effects of various chemicals on the environment will be studied.

AP Environmental Science (4) 544104

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of a course in Chemistry or Biology The AP Environment Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in Environmental Science. The goal of the course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Math Algebraic Concepts (2) 401102

Algebraic Concepts is a support course. Topics include: positive and negative numbers, rational numbers, equations, ratios, proportions and percents, inequalities, graphs, matrices, data analysis and probability, and problem solving. This is an introductory level course and begins to address Maryland Core Learning Goals 1 and 3. two and four year colleges will expect satisfactory completion of Algebra I and II. While this course satisfies the mathematics graduation requirement of a credit in fundamental algebraic concepts, students are expected to complete a course in Algebra I. It is recommended that Algebra I be taken directly following the semester in which Algebraic Concepts has been studied. Students studying Algebraic Concepts will not be eligible to take the High School Assessment in Algebra and Data Analysis (Core Learning Goal 2), since their academic preparation for Algebra remain incomplete until Algebra I has been satisfactorily completed.

Applied Algebra (3) 401103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra I Applied Algebra employs an interactive, applications-centered approach to refining and extending topics associated with algebra concepts. Two and four-year colleges will expect satisfactory completion of Algebra I and II.

Algebra I (3) 401113

Algebra I serves as the primary foundation course for a student’s pursuit of academic mathematics. It is designed to encourage students to pursue mathematics be yound the minimal requirement for graduation. Topics of study include: real number system, polynomials, factoring, solving equatins and inequalities, graphs, algebraic fractions, quadratic equations, matrices, data analysis and probability and is consistent with Maryland Core Learning Goals 1 and 3. Algebra I is also offered in the middle schools. Middle school students, who pass both the course and the county’s Algebra I End-of-course Assessment, will receive 1.0 high school mathematics credit. Note: If a middle school student meets the criteria and receives the one unit of high school credit, the course grade will be included in the high school grade point average (GPA). A middle school student wishing to improve a course grade may retake Algebra I in their freshman year of high school. The student will be awarded the middle school or high school Algebra I course grade, whichever is higher.

Algebra II (3) 401143

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra I Algebra II is an extension of Algebra I and includes, but is not limited to, the set of real numbers including rational and irrational numbers, complex number systems, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, transformations, and exponential functions, with a continuing emphasis on problem solving. Two and three year colleges expect students to have completed Algebra II in order to begin college level mathematics courses. Beginning in 2005, the SAT Math college admissions test will assess Algebra II skills.

Accelerated Algebra II (3) 401173

Accelerated Algebra II is designed for the entering ninth grade student aspiring to complete high mathematics through Calculus. The course is intended to provide a more in-depth study of the Algebra II topics with a greater emphasis on critical thinking. Additional topics include polynomial and quadratic inequalities, Cramer’s Rule, synthetic division, Descartes’ Rule of Signs, as well as real world applications. Two and four year colleges expect students to have completed algebra II in order to begin college level mathematics courses. Beginning in 2005, the SAT Math college admissions test will assess Algebra II skills.

Algebra III (3) 403103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra II and Geometry. Algebra III is an in-depth study of advanced concepts which includes, but are not limited to, quadratic equations and functions, polynomial equations, logarithmic functions, matrices, conics, combinatorics, probability, sequences and series. Emphasis is placed on developing an analytical approach to problem solving and applications. This course is recommended for students interested in pursuing a major or career in the areas of mathematics, computer science, engineering or science.

Geometric Concepts (2) 412102

Geometric Concepts represents a more practical approach to geometry topics where formal proofs are not emphasized. The course content is consistent with Maryland Core Learning Goal 2 and includes inductive and deductive reasoning, constructions and topics associated with points, lines, planes, parallelism, transformations, coordinate geometry, congruence, similarities, polygons and circles, area, perimeter and surface area and volume. This course may not be accepted for admission at some tow and four-year colleges. Successful completion of this course satisfies the geometric concepts graduation requirement. The High School Assessment in Geometry, Measurement and Reasoning (Core Learning Goal 2) will be administered at the conclusion of Geometric Concepts.

Applied Geometry (3) 412103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Geometry Applied Geometry employs an interactive applications-centered approach to geometrical concepts, refining and extending topics associated with geometry. This course may not be accepted for admission to some two and four-year colleges.

Geometry (3) 412113

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra I. Geometry includes the study of properties of shapes consistent with the Maryland Core Learning Goal 2. Inductive reasoning, proofs using deductive reasoning, and constructions are incorporated in the discovery of angle relationships and properties of specific polygons and circles. Additional topics include points, lines and planes, parallelism, transformation, coordinate geometry, congruence, right triangles, similarities, areas of plane figures, and surface areas and volumes of solid figures. This course is recommended for college bound students.

Trigonometry (3) 413103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra II and Geometry. Trigonometry provides an in-depth study into the relationships of sides and angles of triangles. Trigonometric functions, circular functions, trigonometric identities, vectors, matrix representations of rotations, polar coordinates and trigonometric representations of complex numbers are among the topics of study. Emphasis is placed on applications of trigonometric functions and related mathematical topics.

AP Calculus I (4) 424104

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Calculus. Where Calculus is not offered, the student must have satisfactorily completed Algebra III and Trigonometry. Advanced Placement Calculus I is a college level course with topics which include functions, limits and continuity, derivatives, integration, and the applications of these topics. The course is designed to prepare the student for the College Board’s Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam and possibly earn credit in college level Calculus.

AP Calculus II (4) 424114

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Advanced Placement Calculus I. Advanced Placement Calculus II is a rigorous extension of the work begun in Advanced Placement Calculus I and covers additional topics including vector functions, parametrically defined curves, polar functions, and convergence of sequence and series. The course is designed to prepare the student for the College Bard’s Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam and possibly earn credit in college level Calculus.

AP Statistics (4) 434104

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra II and Geometry. The purpose of the Advanced Placement Statistics course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, anticipation patterns, and statistical inference. Students who successfully complete the course and advanced placement test may receive credit and/or advanced placement for a one-semester introductory college statistics course.

College Prep Math (3) 454113

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebraic Concepts, Algebra I, Geometric Concepts This course will review concepts and skills in Algebra and Geometry associated with Maryland Core Learning Goals 1, 2, and 3 in math. Completion of this course will provide students with a better opportunity for success on college placement tests such as the SAT and ACT, and college diagnostic math test generally given to college freshman as an entrance requirement. Completion of this course will give students a strong background for the freshman year in college.

Computer Science (3) 462103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Algebra II or Geometry This course is designed for the student who seeks to develop mathematical, problem solving skills using the computer as a tool. Included is a general orientation to programming, techniques of program planning, techniques of programming and programming documentation. Each student is required to complete projects using a programming language. Problem solving skills are developed and refined operating within the rigor of logic systems. One Advanced Technology credit may be awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Advanced Computer Science (3) 463103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Computer Science This course is an extension of Computer Science. Emphasis is placed on problem solving skills and the application of the C++ programming language. Each student is expected to complete extensive projects. Topics covered include data manipulation, high-resolution graphics, and search and sort procedures. One Advanced Technology credit may be awarded upon successful completion of this course.

AP Computer Science (4) 464104

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Advanced Computer Science This course is an extension of Advanced Computer Science . the course is designed to prepare students to take an advanced placement test and earn college credits in Computer Science. The required programming language will be specified by Educational Testing Service. One Advanced Technology credit may be awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Physical Education Physical Education 9 (2) 171102 Physical Education 10-12 (2) 170102

This is a program designed to develop a broad range of skills: body coordination, conditioning and basic skills in individual and dual team sports such at field hockey, baseball, volleyball, softball, tennis, basketball, weight training, aerobics, etc.

Fitness for Life (2) 170122

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Personal Fitness, including Health/Family Life Education. In this semester course, students will be given the opportunity to develop lifelong physical activities. Through activities involving cycling, weight training, jogging, walking, dancing and/or aquatic exercise, students will develop an understanding of the importance of exercising the cardiovascular system in daily life. At the beginning of the course, students will participate in a physical fitness inventory to develop an individualized plan for the semester.

Weightlifting Physical Education (2) 170132

All students in grades 10 through 12 are eligible to take this basic physical fitness/weight training course. Students and the teacher will develop an individualized training program. An individualized physical fitness plan will also be developed in the same manner. Part of the latter plan will be a fifteen minute cardiovascular exercise. Family Consumer Science General Family Consumer Science Family Consumer Science Units of study are: interpersonal relationships, consumer education, personal finance, foods and nutrition, clothing and textiles, career exploration, and time management.

Nutrition Science (2) 152102

This course is designed to teach skills in planning, preparing, and serving meals attractively. Subject areas include: diet and disease; weight control and nutrition; sanitation and safety; food buying and storage; consumer education and careers.

Family and Child Care (2) 153102

This course in designed to teach students about the importance of communication among family members and peers; self-esteem; and personal relationships. Students study their own role in the different types of families and the family’s influence or society. In Child Care, emphasis is placed on acquiring skills needed to care and guide the physical, intellectual, social and emotional needs of preschool children. Students will receive an overview of fetal development. Each student has the opportunity to observe and work with children. Students will learn to be aides in child care centers, nursery schools, Head Start programs, and elementary schools, including legal responsibilities regarding child abuse and neglect. Job seeking, employment skills, and career development activities are included.

Singles Living (2) 154102

This course, recommended for juniors and seniors, helps students learn responsibilities when “living on their own”. Units of study include: getting an apartment; personal finance (including budgeting, savings, utilities, transportation, taxes, and insurance); meal planning; clothing care; interior design; personal relationships; and health care.

Technology Education Foundations of Technology (2) 161102

This course provides students an overview of how to apply technology, resources, requirements, trade-offs, process and controls within structural, mechanical, information, and biotechnical systems. Students explore the design aspects of technology – its evolution, utilization, social and cultural significance. Knowledge and skills in technology systems are acquired through ingenuity challenges and experimentation. This course satisfies the Maryland Technology Education graduation requirement.

Drafting/CADD (3) 163103

Prerequisite: Open to 11th and 12th grade students, satisfactory completion of Foundations of Technology Systems This course provides students the fundamentals of technical drawing through basic, traditional drafting techniques and the use of computer assisted drafting and design programs (CADD). Knowledge and skills are acquired in a variety of applications: blueprints, schematics, engineering and electronic designs and architectural renderings. This course satisfies the Maryland Technology Education requirements for advanced technology credit and may be repeated for additional advanced technology credit.

Fine Arts Fall Band (3) 120103 Spring Band (3) 120103

Prerequisite: Elementary and middle level instruction and proficiency in playing grade III music Band emphasizes participation in all phases of instrumental music such as field shows, parades, concerts, school assemblies, festivals and community performances. All band members are eligible to audition for jazz ensemble, pep band and other smaller groups. This course may be repeated for credit.

Jazz Band (2) 124123

Prerequisite: Elementary and middle level instruction and proficiency in playing grade III music Jazz Ensemble is a course designed for students with an interest in learning to play and perform jazz music. A basic understanding of notation and rhythmic reading is required. Emphasis is placed on the history of jazz and solo improvisation. Students enrolled in this course will develop and refine performance skills related to advanced music. To be offered as a Level 3 course, the Jazz Ensemble will meet to represent the school in outside functions and be encouraged to audition for regional/state ensembles. When possible, Level 3 Jazz Ensemble will participate in an adjudication activity.

Band Front/Majorette (2) 120132

Band Front/Majorette is designed for students who are interested in being a part of one of the marching band auxiliary units. These units include majorettes, color guards, swing flags, batons and rifles. The class usually meets during the same period as band. Emphasis is on skills necessary for successful performances.

Fall Chorus(2/3) 120113 Concert Chorus (2/3) 122113

Prerequisite: Prior Chorus/Choir experience Membership in Concert Chorus is based on student interest and desire to participate in choral music. Emphasis is placed on performance of standard choral music. Students will develop the ability to understand, perceive, create, respond, and appreciate a variety of choral music. Students will participate in public performances such as concerts, holiday programs, and/or community functions. To be offered as a Level 3 course, the Concert Choir will need to represent the school in outside school functions, and be encouraged to audition for regional and/or state choral ensembles. When possible, Level 3 Concert Choir will participate in an adjudication activity.

Show Choir (3) 120123

Students enrolled in this course will develop and refine performance skills related to advanced music. Students will sing and dance in a select ensemble. A variety of choral literature will be utilized to assist students in refining the ability to understand, appreciate, perceive, create, and respond to music. Students will be expected to participate in an variety of performances outside the school day and will be encouraged to audition for regional and/or state choral ensembles. When possible, Show Choir will participate in an adjudication activity.

American Popular Music (3) 121103

During this course, students will study composers, performers, and works of American Popular Music. Units are organized by decade from 1940 to the present. Students will examine the relationship that exists between the culture and history of the decade and its music. Each student will also be expected to choose a particular style of American Popular Music and complete a research project addressing the chosen style.

Music Theory (3) 123113

Music Theory I explores the beginning fundamentals of music. These fundamentals will include elements of pitch, harmony, key and rhythm. Students will be involved with conventional musical analysis, part writing and composition. The course will culminate into a final composition project.

Theatre Productions (3) 220113

Art I (2) 111102

Art I is an introduction to the visual arts through the study of major historical periods and its representative styles, media, and artists. Class work will include related reading, note taking, assessment, and the exploration of elements and principles of design through project work.

Art II (3) 112103

Art II is an extension of the elements and principles introduce in Art I. this course is intended to increase students’ higher-level thinking skills, technical proficiency, and ability to apply these skills to personal expression. Students will be required to complete projects outside of class, and may be asked to keep a sketch/journal.

Advanced Art (3) 113103

Advanced Art is an exploration of a variety of two and three dimension mediums with emphasis on elements and principles of design. Students work to build a comprehensive portfolio of 15-20 pieces. Works may be of a variety of mediums or a collection of mediums and/or subject mater or theme. Advanced Art is offered for serous students interested in pursuing a possible career in visual art. Emphasis is on refining techniques. Developing personal style, medium specialization, and portfolio presentation.

AP Art (4) 114104

This course is designed for those students in grades 11 and 12 who wish to pursue completion of a portfolio to be submitted for college credit. The 36-week course is achieved through comprehensive study in which the student utilizes a variety of materials and demonstrates techniques based on The College Board Advanced Placement Program in Studio Art. Students may elect AP Art in their junior year. Juniors may earn local credit for work in pursuit of the advanced placement review. A nominal fee, to be absorbed by the student, is charged by CPS for portfolio evaluation and credit award.

MSA Support Functional Reading 221111

Functional Math 441111

MCJROTC Leadership I (3) 141103

This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of leadership and discipline. Students are expected to master Marine Corps Junior ROTC unit organizational structure, cadet rank structure, an overview of Marine Corps history, and introductory leadership topics. Wearing the cadet uniform once a week and maintaining grooming standards are required. In addition to close order drill, emphasis is placed on physical fitness and marksmanship. Participation in community service projects is encouraged. Extracurricular activities include Drill Team, Color Guard, and Marksmanship Team.

MCJROTC II (3) 142103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Leadership Education I Leadership instruction continues with such topics as the objectives of leadership, the eleven principles of leadership, and the role of officers and noncommissioned officers within the military. Map reading and land navigation, Naval terminology, and the study of Marine Corps history from 1775 to 1918 are presented in the General Military Subjects category. Job Finding and application procedures are covered as part of Career Exploration. Participation in community service projects is encouraged. Mid-level leadership roles within the cadet company organization may be assigned to second year cadets. Extracurricular activities include Drill Team, Color Guard, and Marksmanship Team.

MCJROTC III (3) 143103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Leadership Education II and junior or senior class membership. Leadership instruction progresses to such topics as the styles of leadership, the importance of inspections and evaluations, and conducting performance evaluations. General Military Subject topics include the organization of the Marine Corps, Marine Corps history during World War II, military medals and ribbons, the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and advanced topics in land navigation. State and Federal careers are explored as part of the Public Service component of the course, as well as the benefits of military service. Mid to upper-level leadership roles within the cadet company organization may be assigned to third year cadets. Extracurricular activities are as indicated previously.

MCJROTC IV (3) 145103

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Leadership Education II and junior or senior class membership. This course is designed to provide students with leadership application experience. Normally assigned to the highest-ranking positions within the cadet company organization, these Cadets serve as role models for younger Cadets. They assist the Marine instructors I conducting physical fitness training, drill, and uniform inspections. They plan, organize and conduct such events as the Marine Corps birthday ceremony, community service events, and a Mess Night. They will write a resume, research paper, and prepare and teach a lesson for a first year cadet class. Marine Corps history from the Korean War to the present is studied along with the organization of the marine Air-Ground Task Force. Extracurricular activities are as indicated previously.

American Military History (3)

This course is a chronological survey from the Colonial Wars to the present. The course is open to all high school students. The fundamental objective of the course is to have students acquire sufficient knowledge to better understand the role and impact that the U.S. military has on the American way of life. By increased knowledge, students will also develop a greater respect for and appreciation of the freedoms and liberties all Americans enjoy. The instructor for this course will be Sgt Major Trostle, but it is not an ROTC course.

Foreign Language French I (3) 261113 French II (3) 262113 French III (3) 263113 French IV (3) 264113 French I, II, III, IV

A sequence of courses designed to develop a student’s ability to understand and use the French language with an ultimate goal of being able to communicate effectively in the target language. There is also an effort to acquaint the students with the cultures of French-speaking people. The four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are emphasized throughout the sequence. French I – An introduction to the French language and culture based on basic vocabulary and grammatical structures. Listening and speaking skills are emphasized. General points of culture are studied. French II – A continuation of the development of the basic skills with more emphasis on speaking and reading. Much more vocabulary and many more grammatical structures, particularly irregular verb forms, are studied. General cultural aspects as well as career letters and applications are included. French III – A continuation of the development of the four basic skills with more emphasis on speaking, reading, and writing. Complex grammatical structures are included as well as a study of more specific vocabularies. With the introduction of several new verb tenses, more effective oral discussions in the target language can be initiated and sustained. French IV – A refinement of the four basic skills with more listening, speaking, and writing activities based on material which has been read. Some of the finer grammatical structures are included as well as the reading of novels and short stories.

Spanish I (3) 261123 Spanish II (3) 262123 Spanish III (3) 263123 Spanish IV (3) 264123 Spanish I, II, III, and Iv 

 A sequence of courses designed to develop a student’s ability to understand, use, read and write the Spanish language and to acquaint students with the Hispanic culture. Spanish I – An introduction to the four basic skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). The most basic structure and vocabulary of the Spanish language and general points of Hispanic culture are studied. Spanish II – A continuation of the development of basic skills. Vocabulary is augmented and the study of verbs and grammatical structures intensified. General points of Spanish culture are studied. Spanish III – A continuation of the four basic skills through intensive grammar drills, discussions, exercises in writing, and samples of Hispanic writing. Spanish IV – A polishing of the four basic skills (emphasis on conversation and writing) through grammar review, discussions and extensive exercises (oral and written) based on novels and short stories studied.

AP Spanish (4) 264124

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Spanish IV Advanced Placement Spanish is a program whose main objective is for students to achieve a high level of ability of listening, reading, speaking, and writing. The course is designed for students capable of doing college level coursework which contains cultural and literary content while emphasizing conversation and composition. Students must be well prepared and have a high level of motivation and interest sufficient to complete out-of –class reading and writing assignments. This course is designed to prepare students take an advanced placement test and earn college credit in Spanish.

Latin I (3) 261133

This is a beginning level for high school students. At this level, students are expected to read and understand simple Latin passages. They become familiar with basic vocabulary, syntax, and inflectional systems orally and in writing. They become aware of the culture through the study of historical figures, holidays, educational practices, geographical features clothing, myths, artifacts, etc. And they apply this knowledge to reflect on their own culture. Additionally, they develop the ability to determine the meaning of words through the study of prefixes, suffixes, and specialized vocabulary. They identify the similarities and differences among languages and cultures. Finally, they use this knowledge outside of the classroom setting. Latin I does not satisfy the foreign language graduation requirements.

Business Foundations of Business/Finance (3) 841103

This course is an overview of the seven pathways that lead to what students should know and be able to do within the business and finance cluster framework: financial services, finance and accounting, human resources, business and administrative services, marketing, legal services, and information services. This is one of the tow courses required before students pursue a certificate in a business technology pathway. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Keyboarding (2) 831112

This course utilizes word processing and related computer software for mastery of the keyboard. Emphasis is placed on touch, keying, editing and formatting procedures. Students obtain skills in accuracy and speed through production of documents, reports, tables, and business forms. College credit may be obtained an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Information Systems (3) 842103

Prerequisite: Keyboarding This course is an overview of four Microsoft XP Office applications: Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Word. This is one of two courses required before students pursue a certificate in a business technology pathway. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Advanced Computer Applications I (3) 842113

Prerequisite: Foundations of Business and Finance and Information Processing This course is focused preparation enabling students to meet testing requirements for Microsoft Office XP Word certification standards. This is a required course for the Administrative Assistant Certificate of Completion. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Woc Community College.

Advanced Computer Applications II (3) 843103

Prerequisite: Advanced Computer Applications I This courses is focused preparation enabling students to meet testing requirements for Microsoft Office XP Excel certification standards. This is a required course for the Administrative Assistant Certificate of Completion. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Marketing I (3) 845113

Prerequisite: Foundations of Business and Finance and Information Processing. This course emphasizes entry into marketing, marketing promotion, functions and problems of management, customer relations, and opportunities in marketing and principles of entrepreneurship. This is a required course for the Marketing Certificate of Completion. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Marketing II (3) 843113

Prerequisite: Marketing I This course emphasizes career planning in marketing, economics of distribution, and product information with a focus on business management. This is a required course for the Marketing Certificate of Completion. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Accounting I (3) 833123

This course helps students understand how systematic records form the basis for business decisions. Students study the accounting cycle and apply the principles to managing a business. This is a required course for the Accounting Certificate of Completion. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Accounting II (3) 834113

Prerequisite: Accounting I This course focuses on the study of accounting methods in preparation for post-secondary study. This is a required course for the Accounting Certificate of Completion. College credit may be obtained through an articulation agreement with Wor-Wic Community College.

Work Based Learning (3) 846113

Prerequisite: Accounting I and II or Advanced Computer Applications I and II or Marketing I and II. This is a capstone course that may be taken in the Accounting pathway or the Administrative Assistant pathway but is required as a part of the Marketing Certificate of Completion. The placement is designed to extend and refine competencies that have been developed through in-school studies. Students meet requirements of this course by involvement in a senior project based on the High Schools That Work model.

Cooperative Education I (2) 903102

Prerequisite: Junior status and/or senior work study intention Cooperative Education I is designed for students who anticipate participating in the Work Study Program their senor year and are not enrolled in an approved Career and Technology Program offering. Emphasis is placed on career orientation and aptitude in the world of work. Job related issues such as appearance, punctuality, ethics and performance qualities are studied. Personal management skills, areas of occupational interest and career development are explored. Field trips to potential sites for employment are part of the curriculum.

Cooperative Education II (2) 904102

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Cooperative Education I This program is designed for juniors and seniors who are participating in the Work Study Program and are not enrolled in or have completed an approved Career and Technology program offering. This course addresses issues related to career exploration and problems experienced on the job. Preferable, students will work in a setting related to a career pathway. Students must be enrolled in at least two other courses each semester.

Internship (3) 904103

Prerequisite: Senior status, 12 or more credits of Level III courses. A maximum of 20 honor roll students in grade 12 who have the approval of the principal and two teacher recommendations are eligible for this internship program. The focus of the program is career awareness, career information, and professional associations at non-school sites. Students intern a minimum of two periods a day or an equivalent amount of time for one semester with a professional sponsor. Students may repeat the internship for a second semester depending upon course enrollment and success in the previous internship experience. Internships may extend beyond the traditional school day. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 270 clock hours in this experience. Each student must be responsible for his/her transportation to and from the location of the internship. Students will be required to keep a daily journal, a weekly time log, and prepare a term project that demonstrates understanding of a specific career through a paper, exhibit and/or other assignment which is approved by the school coordinator and the participating site coordinator. A grade is assigned for course work.



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